Feeling Like a Black Republican

8 Apr

Nas and Jay-Z

Ray: Although I’m a registered Democrat, I feel like a Black Republican. For some time now, I have been torn by the tradition of voting Democrat, but I find myself agreeing with many Republican ideologies. And I’m not afraid to admit it!

Blacks and other minorities are usually expected to vote Democratic, each group of people having their own reasons. However, ever since the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, Black voters have overwhelmingly voted for Democratic candidates in public office elections. We’ll address why in later piece. But for now, I would like to question the values of the modern day Democrat and Republican parties.

When I think of the Democratic party, the first word that comes to mind is entitlement. They are the party of entitlement because they believe that it is a right to have certain personal responsibilities managed by the government. They advocate for the equal distribution of wealth by enforcing extra taxes on wealthy corporations and individuals. Finally, they basically believe that the government can and should solve the nation’s moral ills by creating programs and developing legislation in order to help America. Democrats are called liberal. Fair enough.

Republican values on the other hand, stem from the philosophy of less taxes, less government interaction in an individual’s life, and smaller government organizations. They typically believe in the privitization of industries and in the theoretical principals of a free capitalistic market. That is, they would rather let the market regulate itself with little or no government intervention. They also believe that the government can and should solve the nation’s moral ills by creating programs and developing legislation in order to help America. Republicans are called conservative. Fair enough.

I know that the media likes to divide people because it’s easier to sensationalize a story that way, but most people in America basically want the same things.

First of all, there are religious Democrats as well as religious Republicans, despite what the media would have you believe. I think that if most American’s could avoid war, then they would. I think that if most Americans could opt to pay less taxes, then they would. I think most Americans would agree that abortion is not a desirable procedure to have to endure. It’s also safe to assume that most Americans want to feel safe from both foreign and domestic threats, want jobs and retirement security, healthy families, educated children, and all of the benefits associated with “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” By voting Democrat, Republican, or any other party, we’re merely expressing what we feel is the best way to accommodate our needs and achieve our goals.

Therefore, I often explain to people that I am neither a Democrat or a Republican. I vote based upon what’s right for America at any given time. Those who chose to vote only Democratic or only Republican are doing themselves a great disservice because a country as complex as the United States requires real-time solutions and sometimes “outside the party” thinking is the only way to develop those solutions. The media doesn’t tell me how to vote, and neither do any party leaders. The last time I checked, they were accountable to the American people; not the other way around.

Don’t believe the hype. Vote American.

I’m voting Obama!

*********************************************************************************************************

Seth: Raysean’s central point is right: in today’s political climate we can not find ourselves tied to party affiliation and expect things to work out. I’ll admit, for the average American, it can be hard to keep up with all of the candidates on the ballot for every election and make informed decisions. So on average, people tend to go to the ballot and vote for a party (as apposed to a candidate and their agenda). Not a good idea.

Raysean talked about what Republicans and Democrats are known for. I would say those concepts better represent ideas of conservatism and liberalism. The Bush administration and Republican Congress during his term have abandoned conservative values of fiscal responsibility, smaller government, states’ rights and limited foreign intervention. And Democrats have abandoned tenets of liberalism that call for the best solutions and ideas of the day to be supported. They overspend, overtax, and stifle innovation in the private sector (big and small business). They complain about outsourcing yet fail to pass meaningful legislation that would better train and educate Americans in a global society.

The best ideas of conservative and liberal values are personal responsibility, the value of hard work, and the great importance of American ingenuity and innovation. They also display the need for government to be compassionate, and to understand that when disaster strikes and its citizens fall, it should be there to pick them up. Government should give us the best education possible at the lowest cost, if not free. The world today is too complex for government to be lax, but we understand that too much regulation is burdensome.

Political parties are an important part of government today, but their role and importance can and should be debated. Don’t be afraid to look at candidates in other parties; each should be evaluated on their individual strengths and weaknesses.

Although the National Journal (read here) named Senator Obama the most liberal senator in 2007, I feel he truly represents what it means to be a unifier. His campaign has only been as successful as it has been because he has a broad coalition of support from Democrats, Independents, and Republicans. Although considered very liberal, he sure does know how to reach far across the aisle to bring people together to create solutions. And that’s one reason I support him. By the way, Obama has won about twice as many contests as Senator Clinton. How is it not time for her to leave this race?

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4 Responses to “Feeling Like a Black Republican”

  1. usaconstitution April 8, 2008 at 11:17 am #

    Seth and Ray: I appreciate your open mind. None of us know how things are going to turn out in the long run and still like to think we are voting for a person and not a whole party.

    I wish we could get this kind of debate for a state’s Senators, Representatives AND local representatives this may be a country that values the individual more. Maybe the openness of this election cycle will make that happen.

  2. gunny93 April 9, 2008 at 7:24 pm #

    Ray wrote:
    “Therefore, I often explain to people that I am neither a Democrat or a Republican. I vote based upon what’s right for America at any given time.”

    Good stuff. The problem is most people vote, not what’s best for the country, but what’s best “for me” instead.

    The only other thing I would mention is that I encourage folks to prioritize their issues, determining which ones are more important, and select a candidate based on that.

    For example, I’m a pro-lifer, so I’d vote for a Joe Lieberman before I’d vote for a Rudy Guiliani, even though the GOP tends to be pro-life.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Personal Finance - April 8, 2008

    […] J.D. wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt Ray: Although I’m a registered Democrat, I feel like a Black Republican. For some time now, I have been torn by the tradition of voting Democrat, but I find myself agreeing with many Republican ideologies. And I’m not afraid to admit it! Blacks and other minorities are usually expected to vote Democratic, each group of people having their own reasons. However, ever since the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, Black voters have overwhelmingly voted for Democratic candidates in public office elections. We’ll address why in later piece. But for now, I would like to question the values of the modern day Democrat and Republican parties. When I think of the Democratic party, the first word that comes to mind is entitlement. They are the party of entitlement because they believe that it is a right to have certain personal responsibilities managed by the government. They advocate for the equal distribution of […] […]

  2. Feeling Like a Black Republican - April 8, 2008

    […] Wesley Fryer wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt […]

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